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Supplementary Information Tables: Departmental Results Report

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Reporting on Green Procurement

In this section
  1. Context
  2. Commitments
  3. Report on integrating sustainable development

This supplementary information table supports reporting on green procurement activities in accordance with the Policy on Green Procurement.

1. Context

Although the Canadian Space Agency is not bound by the Federal Sustainable Development Act and is not required to develop a full Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS), the Canadian Space Agency adheres to the principles of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) by complying with the Policy on Green Procurement.

The Policy on Green Procurement supports the Government of Canada's effort to promote environmental stewardship. In keeping with the objectives of the policy, the Canadian Space Agency supports sustainable development by integrating environmental performance considerations into the procurement decision‑making process through the actions described in the to FSDS "Greening Government" goal.

2. Commitments

Greening Government: The Government of Canada will transition to low-carbon, climate-resilient, and green operations
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s)
Performance indicator(s)
Target(s)
Results achieved Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target
Actions supporting the Goal: Greening Government and the Policy on Green Procurement Departments will use environmental criteria to reduce the environmental impact and ensure best value in government procurement decisions

Action 1: Establish the current situation for goods and services purchased:

  • Use the services of Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)'s Greening Government Operations Office to identify, analyze, and obtain a report on buying patterns and operational requirements to identify top relevant goods and services and their environmental impacts;
  • Set departmental targets to reduce the environmental impact on the most relevant goods and services.
  • Starting point:  / Baseline data not available
  • Performance indicators:
    • Date that the report is obtained;
    • Date that the targets are identified.
  • Target: By , the report is obtained and targets are identified
A study conducted by PSPC allowed the CSA to identify some of its most significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emission contributors amongst its purchases of goods and services. Despite the study's limitations, the highest GHG contributors were identified. The CSA is still identifying and analyzing purchases that are outside the scope of the PSPC study. Targets have not yet been identified due to a change in procurement priorities caused by the COVID‑19 pandemic.

These actions will help to support the FSDS goal on greening government by reducing the Government of Canada's GHG emissions intensity from goods and services purchases and ensure best value in government procurement decisions.

Also, incorporating green procurement environmental considerations into purchasing decisions is expected to encourage suppliers to reduce the environmental impact of the goods and services they deliver, and in their supply chains.

Finally, including environmental considerations into CSA procurement instruments, management processes, controls and tools will contribute to transitioning to a low-carbon economy, in addition to supporting the Policy on Green Procurement.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (UNSDG): 12.7 — Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.

Action 2: Implement a Green Procurement Directive to structure the integration of environmental considerations into our procurement processes.
  • Starting point: .
  • Performance indicator: Date of implementation for the Green Procurement Directive
  • Target: Green Procurement Directive ready to be implemented by the end of fiscal year Table note 1.
As communicated in the Supplementary Information Tables for the Departmental Plan, the target date for this indicator was revised to , due to delays caused by the COVID‑19 pandemic.
Action 3: Integrate environmental considerations into contracts and controls, as well as common-use procurement instruments.
  • Starting point:  / Baseline data not available.
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of contracts which include environmental considerations (e.g., reduce, reuse, or include environmental criteria).
  • Target: 50% of contracts will include environmental considerations by .
In , procurement efforts were focused on urgent contracts and the management of the pandemic. Although the exact percentage (%) of procurement processes that include environmental factors is not yet available, environmental criteria were nonetheless included in all relevant contracts and requests for proposals. These were mostly related to the facilities management, which piloted this effort. The information is not part of our computerized data system (SAP) which is essential for data gathering and accurate disclosing. The CSA is looking into the possibility of integrating this information into SAP in order to be able to extract accurate data for future reporting.
Action 4: Include environmental criteria that address carbon reduction, sustainable plastics and broader environmental benefits into procurement for goods and services with environmental impacts.
  • Starting point:  / Baseline data not available.
  • Performance indicator: Percentage (%) of requests for proposals that include environmental criteria.
  • Target: 50% of requests for proposals will include environmental criteria by .
Action 5: Reduce non-hazardous and plastic waste generation
  • Starting points :
    • Facility 1:
      •  / Baseline data for non-hazardous operational waste diversion rate is 36.81% for 54.29 tons of waste produced ().
      •  / Baseline data for plastic waste diversion rate is 35.99% for 2.92 tons of waste produced.
    • Facility 2:
      •  / Baseline data for non-hazardous operational waste diversion rate is 56.81% for 3.73 tons of waste produced ().
      •  / Baseline data for plastic waste diversion rate is 22.74% for 0.129 tons of waste produced.
  • Performance indicators:
    • Percentage (%) by weight of non-hazardous operational waste diverted;
    • Percentage (%) by weight of plastic waste diverted;
    • Percentage (%) by weight of construction and demolition waste diverted;
    • Percentage (%) by weight reduction of waste generated
  • Targets:
    • Diverting at least 75% by weight of non-hazardous operational waste from landfills by ;
    • Diverting at least 75% by weight of plastic waste from landfills by ;
    • Diverting at least 90% by weight of all construction and demolition waste form landfills and striving to achieve 100% by ;
    • Reduce waste generation by 5% by .

The CSA is working to renew the waste program to increase the waste diversion rate and is on track to reach the targets of the Greening Government Strategy. The CSA has finished the installation of new sorting station to increase recycling and add composting collection in support of the targets. In compliance with the requirements, the next waste audits are planned by the end of .

Due to the widespread teleworking during the pandemic, the composting collection was delayed, but the production of non-hazardous operational waste was significantly reduced. The CSA diverted operational waste created by the increase of teleworking equipment purchases, by diverting 136 kg of polystyrene from landfill.

Finally, 99% of CSA's construction and demolition waste from major projects was diverted from landfill.

Results data from other waste types are not available due to operational disruptions from the COVID‑19 pandemic.

By tracking, diverting and reducing its waste, the CSA contributes to reduce scope 3 GHG emission created by waste generation, transportation and disposal. This also allows CSA to collaborate with its suppliers, thus contributing to the transition in the industry.

UNSDG: 12.5 — By , substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse.

Support for Green Procurement will be strengthened, including guidance, tools and training for public service employees Action 6: Ensure that decisions makers, credit card holders, material managers, and employees with procurement and contracting responsibilities undergo compulsory Green Procurement training.
  • Starting point:  / Baseline data not available
  • Performance indicators:
    • Percentage (%) of procurement officers and materiel management functional specialists that have taken the Canada School Public Service Green Procurement Course (C215);
    • Percentage (%) of all acquisition card holders that have taken Canada School Public Service Green Procurement Course (C215);
    • Percentage (%) of new acquisition card holders that have taken Canada School Public Service Green Procurement Course (C215).
  • Targets:
    • 100% of procurement officers and material management will have taken Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement Course (C215) by the end of ;
    • 100% of all acquisition card holders will have taken Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement Course (C215) by the end of ;
    • 100% of new acquisition card holders, starting in , are obligated to take the course (C215) in order to receive a card.

In , the CSA surpassed its targets:

  • As of the end of , 100% of procurement officers and material management had taken Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement Course (C215).
  • Before the end of , 100% of all acquisition card holders will have taken the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement Course (C215).
  • 100% of new acquisition card holders took the course (C215) to receive a card. At the beginning of , a new policy for card holders was implemented at the CSA. This policy requires current and future card holders to take the Green Procurement course (C215) in order to keep or receive an acquisition card.

This will equip the CSA employees so they can contribute to the transition to a low-carbon economy.

UNSDG: 12.8 — By , ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature.

3. Report on integrating sustainable development

During the reporting cycle, the Canadian Space Agency had no proposals that required a strategic environmental assessment (SEA) and no public statements were produced.

Details on transfer payment programs

In this section

Contributions under the Canada/European Space Agency (ESA) Cooperation Agreement

Details on Contributions under the Canada/European Space Agency (ESA) Cooperation Agreement
Start date The renewed Agreement was signed on , and ratified on . The revised Terms and Conditions were approved in , and became effective on .
End date (end date of the Agreement).
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions The revised Terms and Conditions for the contributions, under the Cooperation Agreement, were approved, and became effective in .
Link to departmental result(s) Canada's investments in space benefit the Canadian economy
Link to the department's Program Inventory Space Capacity Development
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program Enhance Canadian industry's technological base and provide access to European markets for value-added products and services in the fields of Earth Observation (EO), telecommunications, navigation, space exploration and generic technological activities; foster the participation of Canadian academia in missions and make possible the demonstration of Canadian space technologies in European microgravity and space exploration missions and programs. This is achieved through a financial contribution by the CSA to ESA optional programs.
Results achieved

For the period of to , Canada has achieved a return coefficient of 0.90, which is currently slightly lower than the minimum guaranteed to ESA Member States by the end of , i.e. 0.93. The value of the current coefficient is due to delays in the award of two significant contracts to Canadian industry. It is expected that the coefficient will increase after these contracts are awarded. Since the coefficient is cumulative and a new period started in , it can only be seen as preliminary. The target will be closer to the ideal value of 1 as the statistical period increases. Canada's return coefficient indicates its successfulness in obtaining its fair share of ESA contracts as part of the Canada – ESA Cooperation Agreement.

Through Canada's participation in ESA EO programs, more specifically the Future Earth Observation Program, Copernicus Space Component Program and European Earth Watch, the CSA has continued to support Canadian companies with the development of advanced space-borne instruments and subsystems, user-oriented applications, and ensuring access to the data for Canadians.

As part of its partnership with the ESA, the CSA has continued to position the Canadian industry and scientists as key players in scientific and technological development related to the European Exploration Envelope Programme (E3P), in which Canada subscribed an additional 10M€ (approx. $16M) in . For instance, Canadian companies are providing rover's chassis, electronics and navigation cameras for the second ExoMars mission as well as Hazard Detection and Avoidance software for Moon landing. Canadian universities also got involved in studies on convection and interfacial mass exchange.

Canada's participation in the European Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems (ARTES) has continued to allow the Canadian industry to access forward-looking studies on new telecommunications services, and to develop new satellites, technologies, equipment, and applications.

In addition, the CSA supported the development and demonstration of innovative space technologies through its participation in ESA's General Space Technology Programme (GSTP), such as an antenna for lunar relay satellites, a high torque reaction wheel for the ALTIUS satellite mission, and critical technologies for the Precise Formation Flying Demonstration mission.

Finally, Canadian companies continued to work on projects under the Navigation Innovation and Support Program (NAVISP). These projects include the development of a high performance, low-profile multi-constellation antenna targeting survey, precision agriculture, marine and aviation market segments; expansion of Skydel's Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) simulator to seize arising European market opportunities; and development of a hardware / software codesign framework for GNSS software receiver by Space Codesign.

In , Canadian companies have completed 11 contracts under various ESA programs, increasing the technology readiness level of as many Canadian technologies.

Two Canadian technologies have flown as a result of Canada's participation in ESA programs in : exactEarth's ESAIL microsatellite that was launched in to provide advanced, high-performance vessel detection and tracking capability, and MDA's radar altimeter on the first of the two satellites of the Sentinel-6 mission, which was launched in to measure sea level change from space.

Seven new technologies were identified as contenders for future EO and space exploration missions, such as an antenna and a weather imaging instrument, to name a few.

Findings of audits completed in
N/A
Findings of evaluations completed in No evaluation was carried out over the fiscal year. The next evaluation will be carried out in and .
Engagement of applicants and recipients in The CSA continued to actively consult the Canadian space sector (industry and academia) and Government of Canada organizations as part of the activities and projects selection process.

Financial information (dollars)

Financial information (dollars) of the Contributions under the Canada/European Space Agency (ESA) Cooperation Agreement
Type of transfer payment Actual
spending
Actual
spending
Planned
spending
Total
authorities available for use
Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance ( actual minus
planned)
Total contributions 29,977,215 36,092,091 39,386,000 50,865,011 50,810,467 11,424,467
Total program 29,977,215 36,092,091 39,386,000 50,865,011 50,810,467 11,424,467
Explanation of variances The variance of $11.4 million is due to the increase in payments, in accordance with the budgetary feasibility principle governing member states' and Canada's contributions to ESA, against Canada's binding multi-year legal obligations with respect to its participation in ESA optional programs, including the implementation of the Treasury Board approval for the use of International Space Station Common System Operations Costs funds towards the Canadian participation in ESA's Mars Sample Return mission.

Class Grant and Contribution Program to Support Research, Awareness and Learning in Space Science and Technology

Details on Class Grant and Contribution Program to Support Research, Awareness and Learning in Space Science and Technology
Start date
End date N/A — Ongoing program
Type of transfer payment Grant and Contribution
Type of appropriation Annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
Link to departmental result(s)
  • Space research and development advance science and technology
  • Canadians engage with space
  • Space information and technologies improve the lives of Canadians
  • Canada's investments in space benefit the Canadian economy
Link to the department's Program Inventory
  • Space Utilization
  • Space Exploration
  • Space Capacity Development
  • Internal Services (Communications Services, Management and Oversight Services)
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

This program supports knowledge development and innovation in the CSA's priority areas while increasing the awareness and participation of Canadians in space-related disciplines and activities. The program has two components:

  1. Research and
  2. Awareness and Learning.

The Research Component aims to support the development of science and technology; foster the continual development of a critical mass of researchers and highly qualified personnel in Canada; and support information gathering and space-related studies and research pertaining to the CSA's priorities.

The Awareness and Learning Component aims to provide learning opportunities to Canadian students in various space-related disciplines; to support the operations of organizations dedicated to space research and education; and to increase awareness of Canadian space science and technology among Canadian students and their participation in related activities.

This Transfer Payment Program is composed of grants and contributions.

Results achieved

In , Canadian universities, for-profit and not-for-profit organizations established and operating in Canada as well as individuals have made significant contributions to knowledge creation in space science and technology priority areas through 11 new Announcements of Opportunity (AOs) and initiatives, resulting in 479 new grants and contributions. For more information regarding these initiatives consult the Programs Results Section of the DRR.

Global Results: The annual follow-up surveys enabled the CSA to capture the following results: 645 publications were written, among which 362 were peer reviewed. Among the 147 presentations made, 33 were focused on being accessible to the general public and  3,466 research team members were involved in the supported initiatives, including 188 Faculty members, 1,664 students and Post-Doctoral Fellows and 240 technicians or other research team members.

A total of 331 organizations — mostly universities as well as foreign research and private sector organizations — have been involved in the funded projects. 54% of research partners are international and 46% are national.

Findings of audits completed in
No audit was completed in the fiscal year.
Findings of evaluations completed in No evaluation was completed in the fiscal year. An evaluation started in and should be completed in .
Engagement of applicants and recipients in

Since , an initiative to engage recipients has been undertaken through a survey. The CSA has extended the reach of this initiative via its web page to establish a dialogue with recipients and potential applicants.

Consultations, presentations and discussions with the academic community, industrial stakeholders and other potential recipient groups are ongoing and will continue.

Financial information (dollars)

Financial information (dollars) of Class Grant and Contribution Program to Support Research, Awareness and Learning in Space Science and Technology
Type of transfer payment Actual
spending
Actual
spending
Planned
spending
Total
authorities available for use
Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance ( actual minus planned)
Total grants 10,423,648 9,284,634 10,407,000 9,638,685 9,638,684 -768,316
Total contributions 15,975,628 14,205,899 18,172,000 19,790,304 19,790,299 1,618,299
Total program 26,399,276 23,490,533 28,579,000 29,428,989 29,428,983 849,983
Explanation of variances The variance is due to several factors, which are inherent in the management of the CSA's resources. They result from the fact that budgetary requirements by vote are not linear from one year to the next, requiring vote transfers or fund carry forwards to another fiscal year.

Gender-based analysis plus

In this section

Section 1: Institutional GBA Plus Capacity

Since , Gender-based Analysis plus (GBA Plus) is integrated in the requirements of the Investment Governance and Monitoring Framework and is part of the roles and responsibilities of the executive sponsor.

A policy has been implemented to state the CSA's commitment towards GBA Plus and to ensure that CSA initiatives, programs and policies do not have detrimental impacts on certain diverse groups of women, men and non-binary people. The CSA's Policy on GBA Plus also sets out the roles and responsibilities of CSA personnel and stipulates that all initiatives that are new or which need re-approval will be subject to a GBA Plus. More specifically, the policy requires that:

  • All CSA initiatives (e.g. policies, programs, projects, grants and contributions, budget proposals) that are new or which need re-approval will be subject to GBA Plus to ensure they do not have detrimental impacts on certain diverse groups of women and men and that they seek to achieve better results for all Canadians.
  • Documented evidence of the elaboration of GBA Plus is required to support approval of initiatives for Treasury Board (TB) Submissions and Memorandum to Cabinet (MC).
  • The documented evidence of the elaboration of GBA Plus will be collected in order to monitor the implementation and continuous improvement of the GBA Plus processes at CSA, and for reporting to Women and Gender Equality Canada (WAGE) on a regular basis.

The President is responsible for ensuring that the Government of Canada's commitment to implementing GBA Plus is fulfilled at the CSA as per the aforementioned policy requirements.

The Executive Committee Members are responsible for:

  • Ensuring that gender and other identity factor considerations are identified and that inequalities are corrected within the context of their respective program's activities, from policy and program development to service delivery, including in MC and TB Submissions.
  • Supporting and encouraging GBA Plus training opportunities for their employees.
  • Appointing one of their members as the GBA Plus Champion that will be the functional authority for GBA Plus at the CSA.
  • Appointing a GBA Plus Point of contact for each branch of the CSA.

The executives and managers are responsible for:

  • Applying GBA Plus, and for integrating the results thereof, to the decision-making process within their sector.
  • Supporting their employees who are engaged in applying GBA Plus to the initiatives under their responsibilities, from concept to implementation to operations as applicable, and for supporting related adjustments that might be required in this regard.
  • Providing training opportunities in GBA Plus for their employees

Section 2: Gender and Diversity Impacts, by Program

  • Core Responsibility: Canada in Space
  • Program Name: Space Capacity Development
  • Target Population: Space sector / Students
Distribution of Benefits:
- - First group Second group Third group Fourth group Fifth group -
By gender Men - Yes - - - Women
- - First
group
Second
group
Third
group
-
By age group Youth Yes - - Senior
Key Impacts:
Statistics Observed ResultsTable note 2 Data Source Comment
Percentage of program funding recipients that are male. 75.3% Performance Indicators Survey -
Percentage of program funding recipients that are students 43% Performance Indicators Survey -
  • Program Name: Space Exploration
  • Target Population: Space Sector
Distribution of Benefits:
- - First group Second group Third group Fourth group Fifth group -
By gender Men - Yes - - - Women
Key Impacts:
Statistics Observed ResultsTable note 3 Data Source Comment
Percentage of program funding recipients that are male 72.2% Performance Indicators Survey -
  • Program Name: Space Utilization
  • Target Population: Space Sector
Distribution of Benefits:
- - First group Second group Third group Fourth group Fifth group -
By gender Men - Yes - - - Women
Key Impacts:
Statistics Observed ResultsTable note 4 Data Source Comment
Percentage of workforce that is male among research and development funding recipients 68.3% Performance Indicators Survey -

GBA Plus Data Collection Plan (all Programs):

In , the CSA's Audit and evaluation directorate carried out an Evaluation of the Implementation of Gender-Based Analysis Plus at the Canadian Space Agency. Its findings show that the CSA is in compliance with federal government's requirements for integrating GBA Plus in federal programs, policies and regulations by ensuring that GBA Plus is integrated in its memoranda to Cabinet and Treasury Board submissions, its funding mechanisms used across the CSA's programs, reports to Parliament and program evaluations. However, it pointed out the need to enhance the CSA's capacity to monitor and report on the impacts of its programs based on identity factors.

To address this issue, the CSA initiated a review of its Departmental Results Framework (DRF) in to include existing disaggregated GBA Plus data into the data collection plans for some indicators. For instance, since , the CSA has been conducting an annual assessment of the impacts of its programs' funding on sex, gender, and other identity factors through the Principal Investigator Survey, but these impacts are not formally monitored in the DRF reporting mechanism. The gap between data collection, planning, and reporting will be resolved through the proposed amendments to the DRF, which is currently being reviewed by the Treasury Board Secretariat. Moreover, additional disaggregated data will be incorporated into the amended indicators, such as education level and geographic location.

Once approved, the revised DRF will ensure the availability, monitoring and reporting of identity-based data, thereby informing the decision-making process with better developed analysis. Implementation is planned for the planning and reporting cycle.

In parallel, the CSA is exploring the possibility of including GBA Plus elements and indicators in Performance Information Profiles (PIP). The PIRs update is expected to be completed in , and implemented in through the annual reporting mechanism.

Section 3: Program Links to Gender Results Framework

Core Responsibility: Canada in Space

Program Links to Gender Results Framework - Core Responsibility: Canada in Space
Program
name
Education and Skills Development Economic Participation and Prosperity Leadership and Democratic Participation Gender-based Violence and Access to Justice Poverty Reduction, Health and Well-Being Gender Equality around the World
Space Capacity Development Yes Yes Yes - - -
Space Exploration - Yes - - Yes -
Space Utilization Yes Yes - - - -

Section 4: Program Links to Quality of Life Framework

Core Responsibility: Canada in Space

Section 4: Program Links to Quality of Life Framework - Core Responsibility: Canada in Space
Program
name
Prosperity Health Environment Society Good
Governance
Space Capacity Development Yes - Yes - -
Space Exploration Yes - - - -
Space Utilization Yes - Yes - -

Definitions

Target Population:

See Finance Canada definition of Target Group in the following document: User Instructions for the GBA Plus Departmental Summary – Budget  - Canada.ca)

Gender Scale:
  • First group: Predominantly men (e.g. 80 per cent or more men)
  • Second group: 60 per cent — 79 per cent men
  • Third group: Broadly gender-balanced
  • Forth group: 60 per cent — 79 per cent women
  • Fifth group: Predominantly women (e.g. 80 per cent or more women)
Workforce Scale:
  • First group: Strongly benefits low income individuals (Strongly progressive)
  • Second group: Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive)
  • Third group: No significant distributional impacts
  • Forth group: Somewhat benefits high income individuals (Somewhat regressive)
  • Fifth group: Strongly benefits high income individuals (Strongly regressive)
Income Level Scale:
  • First group: Strongly benefits low income individuals (Strongly progressive)
  • Second group: Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive)
  • Third group: No significant distributional impacts
  • Forth group: Somewhat benefits high income individuals (Somewhat regressive)
  • Fifth group: Strongly benefits high income individuals (Strongly regressive)
Age Group Scale :
  • First group: Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations
  • Second group: No significant inter-generational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors
  • Third group: Primarily benefits seniors or the baby boom generation
Gender Results Framework Pillars:

see definitions at the following page: Gender Results Framework — Women and Gender Equality Canada)

Quality of Life Domains:

See definitions in Annex-5-eng.pdf (budget.gc.ca)

Response to parliamentary committees and external audits

Response to parliamentary committees

The President of the Canadian Space Agency appeared at the following committee: Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology (INDU), 43rd Parliament, 2nd Session

There were no recommendations for the Canadian Space Agency.

Response to audits conducted by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada (including audits conducted by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

There were no audits in requiring a response.

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

There were no audits in requiring a response.

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