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- Annual Report to Parliament - Privacy Act

Table of Contents

Introduction

The Privacy Act (the Act) came into effect on .

It extends the present laws of Canada that protect the privacy of individuals with respect to personal information about themselves held by a government institution, and that provide individuals with a right of access to that information.

Pursuant to section 72, the head of every federal institution shall prepare an annual report on the administration of the Act within the institution. The reports are submitted to Parliament at the end of each fiscal year.

This report provides information on the activities of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) related to the administration of the Act during the - fiscal year.

Mandate of the Canadian Space Agency

To provide a better understanding of the context in which the Act is implemented at the CSA, this section gives an overview of the CSA's objectives and activities.

The CSA reports to the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development. Its mandate, as set out in the Canadian Space Agency Act, is "to promote the peaceful use and development of space, to advance the knowledge of space through science and to ensure that space science and technology provide social and economic benefits for Canadians."

Mission

The CSA is committed to leading the development and application of space knowledge for the benefit of Canadians and humanity.

To fulfil its mission, the CSA:

  • pursues excellence collectively;
  • advocates a client-centred attitude;
  • supports employee-oriented practices and open communications;
  • commits itself to both empowerment and accountability; and
  • pledges to co-operate and work with partners for our mutual benefit.

The CSA has been a source of inspiration for Canadians since its creation in . In addition to consolidating major federal space programs, it coordinates all the components of the Canadian Space Program and manages Canada's major space-related activities.

The new Space Strategy for Canada launched in highlighted the importance of space as a strategic national asset and identified harnessing space science and technology as a priority to solve important issues on Earth. This new plan allowed the CSA to undertake a series of initiatives to support the Canadian space industry so it can take full advantage of the growth in the global space sector, while ensuring that Canada keeps pace.

More information on the CSA's activities can be found at: www.asc-csa.gc.ca.

Organizational Structure

Delegations of Authority

Under the Act, the head of the CSA is the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development. In , some of the powers under the Act were delegated by the Minister to the incumbents of the CSA positions of Vice-President, Chief Information Officer, and Access to Information and Open Data coordinator. The appended grid on delegation of authorities identifies the powers delegated.

The Access to Information and Open Data coordinator is responsible for implementing the Act on a daily basis and reports to the Vice-President and the Chief Information Officer.

The Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Office is comprised of the Access to Information and Open Data Coordinator and the Access to Information and Open Data Officer.

This office works closely with all sectors of the CSA to ensure the application of and compliance with the Act.

Lastly, the Act allows government institutions to provide services related to access to information to another government institution presided over by the same minister or under the responsibility of the same minister, or to receive such services themselves from any other such institution. However, at the CSA, no contract for such services, as stipulated in section 73.1 of the Act, has been entered into with any other government institution.

Evolving Role of the ATIP Office

In , the ATIP Office was mandated not only to process requests under the Act and to report on its administration, but also to implement the Open Government and Open Science initiatives.

Open government is becoming a global priority in improving transparency and making information more readily available to the public. The Government of Canada is no exception in that regard and has implemented a series of commitments in which departments and agencies are taking part. Briefly, the goal is to release as much data and information as possible in a manner that is accessible, interoperable and publicly usable. This vision of transparency is closely linked to the vision for the application of the Act.

Further to a decision to link Access-to-Information and Open Government and open science activities, the ATIP Office has become a one-stop shop for CSA employees wishing to share information and members of the public wishing to obtain information.

This innovative and effective pairing, which resulted from a centralization of activities, has made it possible for the CSA to optimize its acquisition and application of knowledge.

Request Processing Procedure

When it receives a request under the Act, the ATIP Office consults the CSA's office of primary interest and, when necessary and appropriate depending on the case, Justice Canada, the information-related communities of practice, the Treasury Board Secretariat or other institutions.

The ATIP Office uses an electronic ATIP request processing system to record the administrative actions taken, to review the records in question and to apply any exemptions and exclusions.

Once the records have been analyzed and consultations have taken place, the ATIP Office recommends the application of exemptions to the CSA's vice-president and Chief Information Officer, who are responsible for approving the release of records under the Act. The records in response to the requests are then sent to the requesters.

Performance for

During the reporting period, the CSA processed 33 personal information requests. Of the 33 requests processed, 94% received a response within the legislated time limits.

For more details about the processing of the requests, consult the highlights of the statistical report below. The detailed statistical report for the period of , to , can be found in the appendix.

Highlights of the Statistical Report

Requests Received and Processed

For a second year in a row, the CSA received a larger number of requests for access to personal information. In , 13 requests were received, whereas 35 requests were received in , an increase of 169%.

The CSA processed 33 requests during the year, including one outstanding request from the previous fiscal year, while three others were carried over to the next fiscal year.

The following table illustrates the trend in requests received and carried over during the last five fiscal years:

Requests received and carried over
- - - - -
Carried over from the previous fiscal year 0 1 0 1 3
Received during the fiscal year 2 4 9 13 33

Provisions and Processing Times

The Act stipulates that responses to access requests must normally be provided within 30 calendar days. Of the requests processed in , 23 (70%) were processed within this timeframe, while responses for 10 requests (30%) took more than 30 days.

It is important to note that the Act provides for the extension of processing times for some requests if, for instance, consultations must be held or if processing the requests would interfere with the operations of the government institution (for example, a large volume of requests). Unusually this year, the CSA received a large number of requests at the same time. Because of the limited number of resources for processing such volume, the ATIP Office had to make use of the time limit extension authorized by the Act. As a result, a total of 15 requests were extended because of the large volume of requests that had to be processed or the consultations required. Therefore, taking into account the extensions authorized by the Act, 94% of the requests processed by the ATIP Office received a response within the prescribed time limits.

Processing Times
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days
Number of requests 7 16 9 1

Of the 33 requests processed this year, 11 of them (33%) were disclosed in part and 11 (33%) were disclosed in full. For the remaining requests, either the request was abandoned by the requester (3%) or no records existed (30%). The following table illustrates all the dispositions mentioned.

Disposition of Requests
All Disclosed Disclosed
in Part
No records
exist
Request
Abandoned
Number of requests 11 11 10 1

Exemptions and Exclusions Invoked

Section 26 was invoked for 10 of the 11 requests disclosed in part (91%) because they contained a great deal of information about other individuals.

The CSA also had to use the Access to Information Act to protect some of the information in several of the requests, as either it was obtained in confidence from other governments, or it involved advice or testing procedures.

Format of Information Released

Of the 22 requests that received a response this year, a total of 20 disclosures (91%) were provided electronically, while two (9%) were provided on paper because of the large volume of records.

Pages Reviewed and Disclosed

With the Treasury Board Secretariat's introduction in of a new detailed statistical report, it is now possible to report the number of pages reviewed and compare it with the number of pages disclosed.

The number of pages reviewed or disclosed can vary considerably from year to year, depending on the subject matter of the requests and the quantity of relevant records held by the CSA.

The increase in the number of requests in resulted in a direct increase in the number of pages disclosed. In fact, 1280 pages were disclosed in , compared to 3538 pages this year.

The number of pages processed during the year also increased, and this was an added complexity for the ATIP Office. In total, 4,391 pages were processed, compared with 1,606 the previous year. In addition to the pages, two audio recordings, three videos and 18 photographs were processed.

In total, 13 requests contained fewer than 100 pages, 8 requests contained between 101 and 500 pages, 1 request contained between 501 and 1,000 pages, and 1 request required over 1,000 pages to be processed.

The following table illustrates the fluctuation in the number of pages disclosed over the last five years:

Number of pages disclosed
- - - - -
Number of pages 3,538 1,280 5,347 337 0

Consultations and Extensions

Because a larger volume of requests were received this year and more consultations were required, 15 requests needed to be extended. Of these, 80% were extended pursuant to section 15(a)(i) – Interference with the operations of the government institution, and 20% pursuant to section 15(a)(ii) – Consultation.

Three requests needed to be extended because of consultations required by the Act. The consultations took place with other government institutions or other agencies. These requests were processed within 60 days.

Consultations Received from Other Federal Institutions

It is rare for the CSA to receive consultation requests from other government institutions or organizations relating to personal information. In , the CSA did not receive any such requests.

Administration Fees and Costs

For the reporting period, operating costs were estimated at $79,142. Of this amount, 41% were for salaries, totalling $32,703. Goods and services accounted for 59% of the costs ($46,439). These expenditures resulted from the acquisition and roll‑out of a new electronic system for processing access requests and the awarding of contracts for preparing privacy impact assessments. They also included costs related to the purchase of administrative supplies, training and travel.

Impact of COVID‑19

For this reporting period, the ATIP Office was only slightly affected by the situation related to the COVID‑19 pandemic. Only two requests were received after the CSA's offices were closed.

Despite the closure, the ATIP Office was able to minimize the situation's impact on its operations through the use of telework. Since each ATIP Office employees had the equipment needed to continue processing access requests, the two requests received after the offices were closed were processed according to the usual procedures.

Training and Awareness-Raising

In addition to managing ATIP requests, ATIP Office staff provide CSA employees with guidance and advice on complying with the Act. The guidance and advice are presented in a personalized way based on the requests.

In , the ATIP Office offered information sessions to all CSA employees not only on privacy, but also on the entry into force of the new Access to Information Act in . A total of 18 information sessions were offered, and 261 employees took part in them.

In addition, employees were invited to take the Access to Information and Privacy Fundamentals course (I015) given by the Canada School of Public Service, through its corporate calendar of mandatory and optional training. A total of five learners took the training this year.

Information sessions on processing Access to Information requests and awareness sessions on record marking at the CSA were also available upon request. However, none of those sessions were given in .

Electronic Tools

During the year, the ATIP Office made several changes relating to tools used to process and approve access requests.

The CSA was already receiving requests electronically through the online request system maintained by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada. However, steps were taken during the year to migrate to the Treasury Board Secretariat's ATIP On-Line Request Service platform. This migration was completed in .

The CSA also acquired a new electronic management system for access to information requests. In , the system was implemented, functional testing was conducted and employees underwent training so that the system would be operational at the beginning of . The project was completed and the system was launched.

Another of the ATIP Office's objectives in was to change its request approval process, the goal being to switch from a paper approval process to an electronic approval process. This transition was sped up slightly because of the pandemic. As a result, the electronic correspondence management system was used not only to get the approvals needed to release responses, but also to get the electronic signature of the delegated authorities required to send the responses. Therefore, this transition allowed the ATIP Office to avoid any pandemic-related slowdown in processing requests.

Policies, Guidelines, Procedures and Initiatives

Updates

In , after Bill C‑58 entered into force, the ATIP Office completely updated its guidelines and procedures for administering the Act. A new access to information and privacy manual was produced and posted on the CSA's intranet. Intranet pages on the ATIP Office's services were also created and posted in order to better communicate employees' roles and responsibilities in using and protecting personal information.

Summary of Key Issues and Actions Taken with Respect to Complaints or Audits

One complaint was received during the year. The Office of the Privacy Commissioner launched an investigation using its early resolution process. The CSA had no records to provide and the complaint was closed, with its status marked as "resolved."

Compliance Monitoring

The time spent on processing requests is tracked through the electronic ATIP request processing system. For related CSA reporting purposes, reports, including a weekly report, are sent to senior management and others involved in the requests.

Material Privacy Breach

A privacy breach involves improper or unauthorized collection, use, disclosure, retention or disposal of personal information. In , there were no material privacy breaches.

Privacy Impact Assessments

All government institutions that are subject to the Act and that create, sponsor or fund programs, projects or initiatives involving the collection, use or sharing of personal information, are responsible for conducting a Privacy Impact Assessment. The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) Directive on Privacy Impact Assessment supports institutions such as the CSA in this activity.

The CSA began drafting two Privacy Impact Assessments during the year. The assistance of contract employees from agencies was required for these assessments. The first assessed the CSA's Junior Astronauts campaign, while the second assessed a new suite of video recruitment and hiring tools. Both of these assessments were ongoing at the end of the fiscal year and were scheduled to be submitted for approval in .

Disclosure in the Public Interest

The purpose of the CSA's policy on the use of personal information is to ensure that such information is used only for the purposes for which it was collected or for uses consistent with those purposes. In , no personal information was disclosed under paragraphs 8(2)(m) and 8(5).

Conclusion

Through its ATIP Office, the CSA will continue its mandate to respond to all requests for access to personal information in accordance with the spirit and letter of the Act. Its mandate will also include the dissemination of data and information as part of the Open Government and Open Science initiatives.

Delegation Order

Canadian Space Agency

Access to Information Act and Privacy Act Delegation Order

The Minister of Industry Canada, pursuant to section 73 of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, hereby designates the persons holding the positions set out in the schedule hereto, or the persons occupying on an acting basis those positions, to exercise the powers and functions of the Minister as the head of a government institution, under the section of the Acts set out in the schedule opposite each position. This Delegation Order supersedes all previous Delegation Orders

Schedule

Position Access to information Act and Regulations Privacy Act and Regulations
Vice President Full authority Full authority
Chief Information Officer Full authority Full authority
Coordinator ATIP Services Section: 4(2.1), 7, 8(1), 9, 11(2), (3), (4), (5), (6),12, 25, 26, 27(1), (4), 43,44,71,72 Section : 8(4), 9(1), (4), 10, 15, 17, 31, 35(4), 72(1)

Dated, at the City of Ottawa
this
The Honourable Navdeep Singh Bains
Minister of Industry (to be known as Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development)

Statistical Report on the Privacy Act

Name of institution: Canadian Space Agency

Reporting period: to

Section 1: Requests Under the Privacy Act

Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 35
Outstanding from previous reporting period 1
Total 36
Closed during reporting period 33
Carried over to next reporting period 3

Section 2: Requests Closed During the Reporting Period

2.1 Disposition and completion time

Disposition of Requests Completion Time
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
All disclosed 1 9 1 0 0 0 0 11
Disclosed in part 0 4 6 1 0 0 0 11
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 5 3 2 0 0 0 0 10
Request abandoned 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 7 16 9 1 0 0 0 33

2.2 Exemptions

Section Number of Requests
18(2) 0
19(1)(a) 0
19(1)(b) 0
19(1)(c) 0
19(1)(d) 0
19(1)(e) 0
19(1)(f) 0
20 0
21 0
22(1)(a)(i) 0
22(1)(a)(ii) 0
22(1)(a)(iii) 0
22(1)(b) 0
22(1)(c) 0
22(2) 0
22.1 0
22.2 0
22.3 0
22.4 0
23(a) 0
23(b) 0
24(a) 0
24(b) 0
25 0
26 10
27 0
27.1 0
28 0

2.3 Exclusions

Section Number of Requests
69(1)(a) 0
69(1)(b) 0
69.1 0
70(1) 0
70(1)(a) 0
70(1)(b) 0
70(1)(c) 0
70(1)(d) 0
70(1)(e) 0
70(1)(f) 0
70.1 0

2.4 Format of information released

Paper Electronic Other
2 20 0

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Number of Pages Processed Number of Pages Disclosed Number of Requests
4391 3538 23
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Less Than 100
Pages Processed
101-500
Pages Processed
501-1000
Pages Processed
1001-5000
Pages Processed
More Than 5000
Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
All disclosed 10 177 1 188 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 2 29 7 1376 1 559 1 1209 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 13 206 8 1564 1 559 1 1209 0 0
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation Required Legal Advice Sought Interwoven Information Other Total
All disclosed 1 0 0 0 1
Disclosed in part 2 0 0 0 2
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0
Total 3 0 0 0 3

2.6 Closed requests

2.6.1 Number of requests closed within legislated timelines
Requests closed within legislated timelines
Number of requests closed within legislated timelines 31
Percentage of requests closed within legislated timelines (%) 93.9

2.7 Deemed refusals

2.7.1 Reasons for not meeting legislated timelines
Number of Requests Closed Past the Legislated Timelines Principal Reason
Interference with Operations / Workload External Consultation Internal Consultation Other
2 0 0 0 2
2.7.2 Requests closed beyond legislated timelines (including any extension taken)
Number of Days Past Legislated Timelines Number of Requests Past Legislated Timeline Where No Extension Was Taken Number of Requests Past Legislated Timelines Where an Extension Was Taken Total
1 to 15 days 1 0 1
16 to 30 days 0 0 0
31 to 60 days 1 0 1
61 to 120 days 0 0 0
121 to 180 days 0 0 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0
More than 365 days 0 0 0
Total 2 0 2

2.8 Requests for translation

Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Section 3: Disclosures Under Subsections 8(2) and 8(5)

Paragraph 8(2)(e) Paragraph 8(2)(m) Subsection 8(5) Total
0 0 0 0

Section 4: Requests for Correction of Personal Information and Notations

Disposition for Correction Requests Received Number
Notations attached 0
Requests for correction accepted 0
Total 0

Section 5: Extensions

5.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests

Number of requests where an extension was taken 15(a)(i) Interference with operations 15(a)(ii) Consultation 15(b)
Translation purposes or conversion
Further review required to determine exemptions Large volume of pages Large volume of requests Documents are difficult to obtain Cabinet
Confidence
Section (Section 70)
External Internal
15 0 1 11 0 0 1 2 0

5.2 Length of extensions

Length of Extensions 15(a)(i) Interference with operations 15(a)(ii) Consultation 15(b)
Translation purposes or conversion
Further review required to determine exemptions Large volume of pages Large volume of requests Documents are difficult to obtain Cabinet
Confidence
Section (Section 70)
External Internal
1 to 15 days 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 0 1 11 0 0 1 2 0
31 days or greater - - - - - - - 0
Total 0 1 11 0 0 1 2 0

Section 6: Consultations Received From Other Institutions and Organizations

6.1 Consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions and other organizations

Consultations Other Government of Canada Institutions Number of Pages to Review Other Organizations Number of Pages to Review
Received during the reporting period 0 0 0 0
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0
Closed during the reporting period 0 0 0 0
Carried over to the next reporting period 0 0 0 0

6.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions

Recommendation Number of Days Required to Complete Consultation Requests
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
All disclosed 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

6.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations

Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Ddays More Than 365 Days Total
All disclosed 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Section 7: Completion Time of Consultations on Cabinet Confidences

7.1 Requests with Legal Services

Number of Days Fewer Than 100
Pages Processed
101-500
Pages Processed
501-1000
Pages Processed
1001-5000
Pages Processed
More than 5000
Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

7.2 Requests with Privy Council Office

Number of Days Fewer Than 100
Pages Processed
101-500
Pages Processed
501-1000
Pages Processed
1001-5000
Pages Processed
More than 5000
Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Section 8: Complaints and Investigations Notices Received

Section 31 Section 33 Section 35 Court action Total
1 0 0 0 1

Section 9: Privacy Impact Assessments (PIA) and Personal Information Banks (PIB)

9.1 Privacy Impact Assessments

Number of PIA(s) completed 0

9.2 Personal Information Banks

Personal Information Banks Active Created Terminated Modified
- 54 0 0 0

Section 10: Material Privacy Breaches

Number of material privacy breaches reported to TBS 0
Number of material privacy breaches reported to OPC 0

Section 11: Resources Related to the Privacy Act

11.1 Costs

Expenditures Amount
Salaries $30,770
Overtime $1,933
Goods and Services
  • Professional services contracts: $34,625
  • Other: $11,814
$46,439
Total $79,142

11.2 Human Resources

Resources Person Years
Dedicated to Privacy
Activities
Full-time employees 0.46
Part-time and casual employees 0.00
Regional staff 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 0.25
Students 0.00
Total 0.71

Note: Enter values to two decimal places.

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