Agence spatiale canadienne
Symbol of the Government of Canada

Table of Contents

Science

Previous Campaign Overview

October 2003

May 2003

April 2003

September 2002

January 2002

September 2001

July 2001

October 2003

Growth of organic thin films in low gravity conditions (University of Moncton)

The objective of this experiment was to study the effect of gravity on the nucleation stage growth of certain organic thin films.

Relation between the intrinsic wetting properties of surfaces, the configuration of a fluid at the surface of a container and the liquid movement at different g levels (INRS - Énergie et Matériaux)

The objective of the experiment was to capture the contact angles (advancing and receding) that the liquid makes with its containers' inner sidewalls at different g levels.

Top of page

May 2003

G-jitter influence on bulk fluid motion in protein crystal growth systems (University of Toronto)

The objective of the experiment was to study the influence that g-jitter and applied vibrations have on bulk fluid motion in PCG systems and to explain the circular motion observed during space experiments on protein crystal growth.

Experimental setup onboard the Falcon-20

Experimental setup onboard the Falcon-20

Vibration Effects on Particle Motion in Fluid Cells (University of Toronto)

The objective of the experiment was to study the relationship between the solid/liquid or gas/liquid behavior and the magnitudes of g-jitter that could be encountered in future space experiments and to verify the predictions of a numerical model under development.

Experimental setup onboard the Falcon-20

Experimental setup onboard the Falcon-20

Top of page

April 2003

Interface effects in multiphase fluid systems (University of Alberta)

The objective of the experiment was to better understand the effect of particle wettability on emulsion stabilization as well as the effect of gravity on the determination of line tension from the drop size dependence of contact angle.

Experimental setup onboard the Falcon-20  Experimental setup onboard the Falcon-20

Experimental setup onboard the Falcon-20

Top of page

September 2002

Wetting of a liquid surface by another immiscible liquid

The purpose of the experiments conducted by INRS was to collect additional data on the wetting of a liquid surface by another immiscible liquid. Wetting is the manifestation of the interaction of a liquid with a surface and can be characterized by the angle of contact between the surface and the liquid (deposit of a liquid drop on a surface). For more information on this experiment, please consult January 2002 and July 2001 flight campaign. The goal of these experiments is to evaluate the feasability of carrying out the preparation of electroluminescent organic material in thin film form by Physical Vapour Transport (PVT) method in low gravity. The collected data will enable the scientists to learn more about the influence gravity has on the formation of these materials, which have potential in advanced optics and photonics industries.

Flame propagation distance during self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of La-Ca-S glass ceramics

During this flight campaign, Dr. Sam Goroshin and his team from McGill University flew their experiment on Self-propagating High temperature Synthesis (SHS). The objective was to perform the synthesis of La-Ca-S glass ceramics. SHS is a method based on combustion for synthesizing advanced materials such as ceramics, ceramic-composites and intermetallic compounds.

McGill apparatus onboard Falcon 20

McGill apparatus onboard Falcon 20

Electroluminescent materials fabrication in low gravity conditions

The purpose of the experiments conducted by University of Moncton and directed by P.V. Ashrit, was to collect additional data on the experiments made during a previous flight campaign in September 2001. The experimental apparatus was modified to fine-tune the results obtained in the last flight campaign.

Effects of G-Jitter on the motion of particles and bubbles inside liquid-filled cells AND Two-phase flow heat transfer characteristics of an oscillating heat pipe under reduced gravity

In the first experiment, either a solid particle or an air bubble was suspended in a rectangular cell filled with water and subjected to small variations under reduced gravity. Particle density, size and shape (spherical or cylindrical) were systematically changed in the experiment to understand how these parameters affect the response to natural g-jitter and controlled vibrations. This experiment is part of a CSA-funded research project on the effects of G-Jitter on transport phenomena involved in material processing in space.

In the second experiment, the two-phase flow and heat transfer characteristics of an oscillating type heat pipe under different gravitational levels were investigated . This type of a heat pipe has exceptionally high heat transport capability and can be potentially applied to space use because of its light weight and flexible design. But its heat transport mechanisms in normal and reduced gravity are still poorly understood. Thus, conducting experiments on the parabolic aircraft helps determine how gravity plays a role in its operation and the operating mechanisms under reduced gravity.

Top of page

January 2002

Wetting of a Liquid Surface by Another Immiscible Liquid 

The purpose of the experiment was to test the modified experimental apparatus (new liquid cell design based on results obtained during the July 2001 flight campaign) and to gather more experimental data on wetting of a liquid by another immiscible liquid.

Interface effects in multiphase fluid systems

The objective of the experiment was to better understand the geometry and behavior of the three-phase systems involved in solids-stabilized emulsions. Two sets of experiments were carried out. The first set was to study the effect of pressure on contact angle formed by silicone oil and water in contact with the surfaces of glass beads. The second set was to study the effect of particle properties on the behavior of shrinking oil droplets.

University of Alberta apparatus onboard Falcon 20

University of Alberta apparatus onboard Falcon 20

Top of page

September 2001

Microgravity Vibration Isolation Sub-system (MVIS) Umbilicals

The Canadian Space Agency is in the process of developing the Microgravity Vibration Isolation Subsystem for the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL). This system is based on the first and second generations of the CSA’s Microgravity vibration Isolation Mount (MIM).

A key part in the development of the MVIS is to determine the effects of the umbilicals from the equipment rack to the isolated element, the Facility Core Element (FCE).

The purpose of these flights was to evaluate the disturbance effects of the test umbilicals (bundled and unbundled cable umbilicals) on the MIM-2 flotor and to verify finite element models that are intended to determine the effects of these umbilicals on the isolated element of MVIS.

Experimental appartus onboard the Falcon-20

Experimental appartus onboard
the Falcon-20
Umbilicals configuration between the rack and MIM2

Umbilicals configuration between
the rack and MIM2

Electroluminescent materials fabrication in low gravity conditions

The objective of this experiment was to conduct a feasability study of carrying out the preparation of electroluminescent organic material in thin film form by Physical Vapour Transport (PVT) method in low gravity. The understanding of the degree of influence gravity has on the film formation is expected to lead to a better process control in these important materials finding definite application potential in advanced optics and photonics industries. These experiments on the Falcon-20 served as a quick and efficient way to verify this dependance.

Experimental appartus onboard the Falcon-20

Experimental appartus onboard the Falcon-20

Top of page

July 2001

Wetting of a Liquid Surface by Another Immiscible Liquid (INRS - Énergie et matériaux)

During this parabolic flight campaign, the lead scientist Guy Ross, along with research assistant Gilles Abel of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique - Énergie et matériaux, conducted experiments on the wetting of a liquid surface by another immiscible liquid in microgravity. Wetting is the manifestation of the interaction of a liquid with a surface and can be characterized by the angle of contact between the surface and the liquid (deposit of a liquid drop on a surface).

On Earth, because of the effect of gravity, a drop hitting the surface of another liquid will have a tendency to sink which makes the measurement of the angle of contact imprecise, almost impossible. On the other hand, these measurements can be calculated in a microgravity environment such as during a parabolic flight.

Breadboard model affixed to the Falcon 20 experimental aircraft (perspective view)

Breadboard model affixed to the Falcon 20 experimental aircraft (perspective view)
Water drop on a liquid surface in microgravity

Water drop on a liquid surface in microgravity