Strato-Science 2018 campaign

From -, five stratospheric balloons will be launched from the Timmins Stratospheric Balloon Base to test new technologies and conduct science experiments. Each flight will last about 10 hours at an altitude ranging from 33 to 36 kilometers.

What will be on board?

The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) will also launch a small weather balloon carrying Project Taurus designed by Canadian high-school student Krishna Nair from Halton Waldorf School, Ontario.

Payload technical descriptions

Aerosol Limb Imager Version 2 (ALI V2)

ALI V2 is an atmospheric monitoring tool that measures the concentration of aerosols —tiny dispersed particles that affect climate change— in the upper atmosphere using a unique optical device. This instrument is an improved version of an instrument that was successfully deployed on a stratospheric balloon in and . The upgraded version of ALI can detect a wider range of optical wavelengths, measuring both orientations of the polarization state. The development of the instrument was supported by the CSA's Flight and Fieldwork for the Advancement of Science and Technology (FAST) funding initiative.

Developed by: 
University of Saskatchewan
Principal investigator: 
Adam Bourassa
Collaborator: 
CSA

YouTube video - 3-minutes - USask-Canadian Space Agency STRATOS Project - Aerosol Limb Imager (ALI). (Credit: University of Saskatchewan.)

YouTube video - Balloon today, satellite tomorrow! USask's Aerosol Limb Imager studies the climate from space. (Credit: University of Saskatchewan.)

Canadian Atmospheric Laser Absorption Spectroscopy Experiment Test-bed (CALASET)

The CALASET aims to improve an instrument that studies how trace gas concentrations in the atmosphere change with height. Scientists and students are developing a new capacity for validation of satellite limb observations and implementing a platform to test innovative atmospheric measurement technologies. This project is supported by the CSA's FAST funding initiative.

Developed by: 
University of Alberta, University of Toronto
Principal investigator: 
Kaley Walker
Collaborator: 
CSA

Canadian Atmospheric Tomography System (CATS)

The CATS is a tool that can image vertical profiles of trace gases in the atmosphere, such as ozone and nitrogen dioxide. A vertical profile shows the variation in the concentration of a gas at different altitudes. This system will improve spatial resolution by sampling multiple atmospheric zones simultaneously, providing useful information for climate change studies. The development of the CATS was funded by the CSA's Space Technology Development Program (STDP).

Developed by: 
University of Saskatchewan
Principal investigator/co-investigator: 
Adam Bourassa/Doug Degenstein
Collaborators: 
Honeywell, CSA

High-Contrast Imaging Balloon System (HiCIBas)

A promising new type of Low-Order Wave Front Sensor (LOWFS) will be tested during the balloon flight. This instrument is being developed as part of the HiCIBas project, for a generic precision pointing telescope system that could be used in future missions requiring sub-milli-arcsecond level pointing (e.g. high contrast imaging missions). The sensor, which measures the causes of image distortion and blurring in high-contrast imaging is developed with financial support from the CSA's FAST funding initiative.

Developed by: 
Université Laval and Leiden University (Netherlands)
Principal investigator: 
Simon Thibault
Collaborators: 
Nüvü Caméras, ABB, National Research Council Canada, SETI Institute, and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

HiCiBaS team. Left to right: Denis Brousseau, Olivier Côté, Simon Thibault, Deven Patel, Guillaume Allain, Mireille Ouellet and Cédric Vallée. (Credit: Guillaume Allain)

YouTube video (French only) - High-Contrast Imaging Balloon System (HiCIBas) (French only). (Credit: FSG ULAVA)

Otachi Probe and ProtosAT

This payload is composed of a probe and a CubeSat prototype. The flight aims to test the radio communication modules, the power module and film the ascent of the CubeSat.

Developed by: 
NaniKana Aerospace
Principal investigator: 
Jean-François Nadeau

Team photo of Nanikana Aerospace. Front row, left to right: Jean-François Nadeau, President; Francis Nadeau; Leelou Nadeau; Josiane Gilbert, secretary; Marie-Andrée Boucher; and Pierre Brisson, Vice-President. Back row: Alexis Thibodeau; Michel Thibodeau, Vice-President; Marc-André Boucher; and Marie-Josée Neveu. (Credit: Alexis Thibodeau)

YouTube video (French only) - Otachi Probe and ProtosAT. (Credit: Nanikana-Aerospace.)

Payload Remote Interface, Sensor Suite and Mass Memory Subsystem (PRISM)

This multi-purpose electronics box provides onboard Ethernet ports for payloads and offer various services to users, such as real-time localization and attitude, during the entire flight. The instrument also monitors other components onboard the gondola, the platform carrying the experiments and payloads. This instrument is an improved version of a technology initially developed by students from École de technologie supérieure, and further advanced by the CSA.

Developed by: 
École de technologie supérieure, CSA
Collaborator: 
Polytechnique Montréal

Power Distribution Unit and Battery

This modular subsystem consists of a set of Li-ion batteries and a power distribution unit. It was developed to support payloads power requirements during STRATOS flights.

Developed by: 
CSA
Collaborator: 
DPL Science Ltd.

CSA team supporting the Power Distribution Unit and Battery, and the PRISM payload. (Credit: CSA)

SEDS-STRATOS – HABOO and AlbertaSat Teams

The teams, both from the University of Alberta, were selected by SEDS as part of a pan-Canadian competition to design, build and fly their experiments. SEDS is an organization that aims to provide students with research and development opportunities. The HABOO team is studying the reaction of calcite as a substitute aerosol for solar radiation management, a potential tool for climate change mitigation. The AlbertaSat team will validate the mechanical and electrical systems of their CubeSat and test a multispectral imager, a tool that captures specific wavelength ranges in an image.

Developed by: 
University of Alberta
Collaborator: 
Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS)

Team who has been working on developing a prototype multispectral imager, which is the main payload on AlbertaSat's upcoming satellite, Ex-Alta 2. Left to right: Katelyn Ball, Taryn Haluza-Delay, Abby Lacson, Erik Halliwell, and Elliot Saive. (Credit: Katelyn Ball)

YouTube video - High Altitude Balloon Ozone Observer (HABOO)

YouTube video - SEDS Mission

Contact

Should you have any questions regarding the STRATOS program, contact us at asc.stratos.csa@canada.ca.

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