Frequently Asked Questions – ISS

Why Canada conducts science experiments in space

Visit the Why Canada conducts science experiments in space page to learn more.

How long have we been doing science on the ISS?

Canada has been doing science onboard the ISS since 2001. H-Reflex was the first Canadian experiment. Learn more about ISS:

How often do astronauts conduct scientific experiments on the International Space Station

On average, there are 200 international space experiments on board the ISS at any given time. Canadian universities and companies in the space community are involved in advancing our knowledge of health and life sciences in space.

What have been the concrete benefits so far?

Visit the Benefits on Earth of previous Canadian scientific research on the International Space Station page to learn more.

Why is Canada focusing on health sciences experiments?

The effects of space on the human body are the biggest challenge we need to tackle in order to further explore the solar system.

Before we can send humans to Mars for example, we need to mitigate a lot of risks to human health, such as the stiffening of arteries and the consequences of greater exposure to radiation.

Even though the research occurs in space, its findings have impacts here on Earth. The physical symptoms observed among astronauts on a mission are similar to accelerated aging and health problems experienced by sedentary populations. Therefore, the results of life science in space are also relevant for these fields of research.

View the "Why do we do science in space?" video to learn more.

What science experiments is Canada planning to conduct during David Saint-Jacques' mission?

Several Canadian science experiments will be conducted onboard the ISS during David Saint-Jacques' mission, including Vascular Echo (heart), MARROW (blood), T-Bone (bones), Wayfinding (brain), and At Home In Space (a “social brain” experiment).

Additional experiments, such as Vascular Aging, may be added at a later time.

Canadian medical technologies like Bio-Analyzer and, possibly, Bio-Monitor will be tested.

What Canadian science will David Saint-Jacques be a subject for during his mission?

David Saint-Jacques will likely participate in all the Canadian science which will be conducted onboard the ISS during his mission.

More specifically, he will be a subject for Vascular Echo (heart), MARROW (blood), T-Bone (bones), Wayfinding (brain), and At Home In Space (a “social brain” experiment). He will also test technologies, such as Bio-Analyzer and, possibly, Bio-Monitor.

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