12 Great Chris Hadfield Moments in Space

Colonel Chris Hadfield's three missions to space showed people from all over the world what it is like to live in orbit. Through his accomplishments, his photographs and his videos produced by the Canadian Space Agency, he inspired people, made them laugh and taught them new things. Here are 12 memorable moments of this Canadian astronaut's life in space!

Chris Hadfield controls Canadarm

November 1995 – During Mission STS-74, Col. Hadfield's first mission to space, he was the first Canadian to operate the Shuttle's Canadarm. (Credit: NASA)

Astronaut Chris Hadfield on mission STS-100 spacewalk

2001-04-22 – During Mission STS-100, Chris Hadfield became the first Canadian to perform a spacewalk! In this picture, his feet are attached to the Shuttle's Canadarm while he works to install Canadarm2 on the International Space Station. A proud moment for Canada! (Credit: NASA)

Chris Hadfield first Canadian commander of the ISS

2013-03-15 – "Spaceship command. A huge personal and professional moment for me, nicely captured in a photograph." (Chris Hadfield)

On March 13, 2013, during his third mission to space, Chris Hadfield became the first Canadian Commander of the ISS, making him the first Canadian in history to command a spaceship! (Credit: NASA)

The thin atmosphere of Earth seen from the ISS

2013-04-22 – "In proportion, our atmosphere is no thicker than the varnish on a globe. Deceptively fragile." (Chris Hadfield)

Chris Hadfield also captured some great photographs that he shared with the world. He took this photo of Earth's atmosphere from the ISS during Expedition 34/35. (Credit: Canadian Space Agency)

Holiday Merry Making on the ISS

2012-12-25 – Expedition 34 crew members assembled in the Unity node of the ISS for a brief Christmas celebration. (Credit: NASA)

The islands of Dubai seen from the ISS

2013-03-20 – "Some of the things we build for ourselves are puzzlingly visible from space. Such as the islands of Dubai." (Chris Hadfield)

Chris shared some wonderful photographs of Earth on social media. He captured this photo of the islands of Dubai from the ISS during Expedition 34/35. (Credit: Canadian Space Agency/Chris Hadfield)

2013-04-05 - Tears in Space (Don't Fall)

Chris Hadfield filmed some great videos to share his experience in space with the world. In this popular Canadian Space Agency video, he demonstrates the physics of tears in space. (Credits: Canadian Space Agency, NASA)

Image of hurricane Patricia from space

2013-03-18 – "Our Moon, forever to be graced by the footprints of twelve brave men." (Chris Hadfield)

This moonrise was captured by Chris from the ISS. On board the Station, astronauts see the sun and the moon rise 16 times per day. (Credit: Canadian Space Agency/Chris Hadfield)

Chris Hadfield through the Looking Bubble

2013-01-21 – In this picture, Chris Hadfield's image is refracted through a free-floating bubble in the Unity node of the ISS. (Credit: NASA)

The heart-shaped Lake Taupo as seen from the ISS

2013-02-14 – "The world could only make one heart as perfect as yours. #ValentineFromSpace" (Chris Hadfield)

Chris Hadfield posted on Twitter, for Valentine's Day, a series of photos of heart-shaped features seen from space, including this one of Lake Taupo, New Zealand. (Credit: Credit: Canadian Space Agency/Chris Hadfield)

2013-04-16 – Wringing out Water on the ISS - for Science!

This video of a simple science experiment on surface tension in space became one of Chris' most popular videos from space! The experiment was designed by Grade 10 students Kendra Lemke and Meredith Faulkner of Lockview High School as part of the Canadian Space Agency's Science Challenge. (Credits: Canadian Space Agency, NASA)

Chris Hadfield strumming the guitar

2012-12-25 – "With deference to the genius of David Bowie, here's Space Oddity, recorded on Station. A last glimpse of the World." (Chris Hadfield)

In this picture, Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield strums his guitar in the ISS's Cupola. His unforgettable cover of David Bowie's Space Oddity was viewed more than 32 million times all around the world. (Credit: NASA)